Saturday, July 12, 2008

Poetry and Other Deadly Pursuits

If you've ever taken a class in poetry, you've no doubt encountered

A rose is a rose is a rose is a rose

as an example of anapestic tetrameter. This poetic form applies to the Christian Martialist in more ways than one, but I'd like to focus on just one right now:

A fight is a fight is a fight is a fight.

What's the point? Fair question. I've recently discussed the concept of knife fighting or cane fighting vs. fighting with a knife or cane.

Now let's extend that concept. Say your opponent has a weapon and you don't. The fight is still a fight. It hasn't morphed into something else.

Sure, it's a fight with a new element (knife, stick, firearm). That new element introduces increased dangers. But, ultimately, it's still just a fight.

Look at it this way. Suppose this Uruk Hai orc is 6'6" tall, lithe as a cat, quick as a cobra and strong as an ox. In addition, he has a black belt in Kill Fu and perfected his mayhem skills at Folsom Prison. Every strike from this guy might maim or kill you. What do you do?

You pray for grace, reach deep inside for whatever strength and skill lies there, and you fight him with all you've got. How different is that from any other fight?

Now suppose you take the average back-alley Mordor variety orc and put a knife in his hand. Is he any more dangerous than orc #1? Not really. So, you pray for grace, reach deep inside . . . and you fight him with all you've got. How different is that from any other fight?

I can hear someone object (there's always at least one), "But, don't you need special skills to deal with a knife/stick/handgun?" Yep. And you need particular skills to deal with sucker punching, kicking and gouging, as well.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that your psychological reaction should not change if your assailant introduces a weapon. In fact, in my self-talk, I don't like to use the term fight at all.

No matter what the orc may do or may have in his hand, your assignment is the same: neutralize the threat as quickly as possible. That's the strategic objective, no matter how you achieve it. You don't "fight"; you "neutralize threats".

The more you train, & the more scenarios you drill, the more threats you will be able to neutralize. And don't forget tactical withdrawal (i.e., running away) as the great universal neutralizer. He can't punch, stab or shoot you if you're halfway to the next county before he can act.

2 comments:

Dr. Paleo Ph.D. said...

Okay.

That was seriously one of your best posts ever. I loved every word of it.

Now that was poetry!

Spencer

Emil Bandy said...

'So, you pray for grace, reach deep inside . . . and you fight him with all you've got. How different is that from any other fight?'



Amen!


I echo the previous comment fervently.....